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There is a famous story of a final exam in a philosophy class that was one word – “Why?”  Supposedly the answer that got an “A” was “why not?”

There was a skit I saw, or perhaps it is a real memory from my distant past, of a child who answers every statement made by an adult with the interrogative “why”?  Sit down – why?.  Eat your soup – why?  It went on like that ad nauseum.  Irritating it was, and a bit sad.

There is a “festive impertinence to humanity” exhibited by nature.  Like the commercial where a guy escapes a tree falling on his car as he rescues his pizza, only to slip and fall on the ice in front of his house and lose his pizza anyway the random nature of catastrophe is stunning.  Why?

We ask and the ice storm/tornado/hurricane/drought/lightening/fire/wind/insect infestation/flu/ etc. just keep humming along impertinently.

So we turn to God and ask “why”?  Interestingly the ones who ask God the most are the ones who believe in Him the least.  Be that as it may, the question is still asked and the potter seems to have no inclination to explain anything to the clay.  So we sit with our “whys” scrapping our skin with shards of what ever was broken.

A part from the preaching of Christ, God remains as someone said a “nefarious brew of absence and presence”.  I want to explore this some more but first I have to look up my notes and figure out where the quotes come from or someone will ask why I didn’t.

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